DIY Speaker Mounts

Discussion in 'DIY' started by DustinDavis, May 13, 2019.

  1. DustinDavis

    DustinDavis Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2007
    Messages:
    2,423
    Likes Received:
    330
    If you read my DIY Acoustic Panels thread, you might remember that I had no rear speakers mounted, because I refused to run wiring outside the wall, and in being so dogmatic made the job very difficult. Well, I did it. And as I surmised, it was really difficult. But here is the finished product. Then I will give tell you a story about getting there.

    EYAVD4K1QIKGYIaMW%eZXA.jpg

    So, I've had those rear speakers sitting in the equipment closet for more than 2 years, since we moved into the new house, because I couldn't figure out how I was going to mount them to my satisfaction. I started looking online for mounts I could buy, but none of them had the adjustability, or could hold the weight, of my Dynaudio Contour SRs. Nor could they be as flush-mount with the wall as I wanted, nor hide the wiring. One day I had a perhaps misguided epiphany, that I could fabricate my own mounts.

    First I needed to test if I could hide the wiring. The right surround speaker--leftmost in the pic--goes into the garage attic. Check. Left surround goes into the equipment closet, and from there I can run it to the equipment. Check. Rears--those have always been the problem. Here I needed to do some recon. At some point I realized instead of running the wires into the back wall, I could run them upward into the 45 degree angled ceiling. That is roofline right above it, with some space between the drywall and the roofline.

    I measured the locations painstakingly, so they are all equidistant from each other. In retrospect I might like the surrounds to be up to 12 inches farther forward, but I was trying to compromise between front row and back. The sides were easy. The rears--here I needed to do some reconnaissance. So I cut holes through the angled part, and then started fishing up through it into the attic. The left rear turned out pretty straightforward. I got my steel fish tape through it, into the attic, and speaker wire over to the equipment closet on the first try. The right rear--that's another story.

    Turns out the hole into the attic was really close to a diagonal on the exterior. See the place where the wires are crossing beyond my gloves in this pic? That's the ~6 inches square hole that I needed to get the wire through. Problem is, when I fished from the media room, the pole would hit a rafter along the roof line, preventing it from making it to the attic. What I had to do was put a piece of string on the end of the fisher, push the fisher up the rafter in the roof line, retract it a bit, pull the string to angle the fisher such that it faces the hole instead of pushing into the rafter, and then push it back up through the hole, enabling it to emerge in the attic space. Rather, I needed my wife to do all that stuff, while I lie flat on my face across the rafters in the attic, with my face as close to that 6 inch hole as I could muster. Getting that wire run was a major breakthrough. I had to buy a fluorescent fish stick, and a proper 3M respirator instead of cloth surgical mask in order to get through those conditions without breathing so much insulation.

    ispjuVOSTe6k+ZaZqccpkw.jpg

    So, wires run, now I had to figure out the mounts. The trigonometry alone would make an average man succumb. The drawing with the flat top is the side surrounds. The one with the triangle on top is the rear, such that it is flush with the angled ceiling. Then I need to have the wiring run out the top of that mount. But using what materials to start, and how do I work with that materials given the tools I have?

    fullsizeoutput_781a.jpeg

    Well, both materials and tools ended up being a problem. The back of the speakers is ~5.5 inches wide and 10 inches tall. I settled on 4 inch wide mounts because it seemed like it would work, and required one solid piece of wood only. First I bought pressure treated 4x4. That turned out to be a mistake. It's all moist and chemical-ly, and was terrible for drilling. I got a Forstner bit completely stuck in it when I drilled to deep without clearing it. It took me an hour to recover that stuck bit, by picking out the shavings a tiny piece at a time until I freed the bottom part of the bit.

    kaClbxfbSSmDrz6Z%KGcdA.jpg

    So, back to Home Depot and I chose 4 x 4 pine that was not pressure treated. I don't know why I chose pressure treated in the first place except that I was unaware of other options. Now, I start working with new lumber...but how do I cut those angles? Well, needed a mitre saw. So I got a cheapish Ryobi and mounted it to some leftover MDF to make a table. Never used a mitre before so I had to read up on it. It was small enough that I could *barely* clear the vertical 4" cut and the lengthwise 10.5" cut required.

    So that's great, I have diagonal blocks, but I need to drill holes to mount it to the wall, and holes in which to run wiring. For the side surrounds it goes straight out the back. For the rear surrounds, remember the wire needs to escape out the top. That required a 1/2" wide hole around 6 1/2 long. I had a 1/2" bit and a little Black and Decker drill which has been great for making holes in drywall. Alas, the poor girl could not handle the length or girth required for this drilling. So...now I bought a nice Makita cordless and a new titanium drill bit, and it worked. Almost forgot, you have to drill the holes in a certain sequences vs. the cutting, since some the holes meant for mounting to the wall need to be at a right angle to the wall, whereas the holes for the wiring can work on the angle.

    Sides:
    JnS6aUY4S9u9pBn4qNbQ3g.jpg

    Rears:
    YV4tc3qESmOvtZM3d8btiA.jpg

    Quick paint job, same as walls (Behr Night Flight). Screw in the top part (not depicted here) to hold the speaker by the keyhole. Now time to mount. Some places it was drywall, some stud, the usual challenges there.

    Here is the rear detail in place.
    Z0vXtiD2R2yte+xN+LeDuA.jpg

    So that's the story. Can't even explain how much effort and expense ended up going into it. Attic recon, actual wiring, trigonometry, fabrication (multiple times due to screwups), and installation. New Forstner bits, titanium bit, table saw, drill, lumber, screws, flourescent fish stick, respirator, speaker wire, sandpaper, and other materials.

    But I fucking did it.
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2019
    Barry_NJ, DYohn, Carl V and 1 other person like this.
  2. Mike B

    Mike B Well-Known Member Donor Top Poster

    Joined:
    May 18, 2007
    Messages:
    16,607
    Likes Received:
    381
    Nice job!

    You're a better man than me Gunga Din, ain't no way I'm getting up in the attic.
     
  3. DustinDavis

    DustinDavis Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2007
    Messages:
    2,423
    Likes Received:
    330
    And here is how my girls decorate the room.

    RoGE+wxcT8ec1oLXEeBeIw.jpg
     
    Barry_NJ, Zak and Denton like this.
  4. DustinDavis

    DustinDavis Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2007
    Messages:
    2,423
    Likes Received:
    330
    I just realized, that last pic of the rear speaker mount was one of my screw ups. Built everything, painted it, mounted it, and found that the keyhole mount screw was too low, so the speaker is badly overhanging my DIY acoustic panel. I fixed this by moving the keyhole up, and taking a small slice off the bottom of the mount so it didn't look wonky. Here's a better pic of the end result, which you can see clears the acoustic panel by an inch or so. Got lucky here. The shadows still make it look as though it is not very flush with the back wall. In fact it is snug and flush.

    CkB5xSfvQxyNX84vd9tHTg.jpg
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2019
  5. Rick C

    Rick C Active Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2007
    Messages:
    938
    Likes Received:
    91
    Nice job! The room looks great
     
  6. RJ

    RJ Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2007
    Messages:
    212
    Likes Received:
    21
    Thats awesome! Can't wait to see how you tackle Atmos speakers :laughing:
     
  7. DYohn

    DYohn Bronze Member Donor Top Poster

    Joined:
    May 8, 2007
    Messages:
    32,448
    Likes Received:
    2,148
    Very nice work.
     
  8. Barry_NJ

    Barry_NJ Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2010
    Messages:
    1,649
    Likes Received:
    157
    Nice work, nice room!
     

Share This Page