Would you buy imperfect produce?

Discussion in 'The VIP Lounj' started by pillatier, Mar 10, 2019.

  1. pillatier

    pillatier Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2007
    Messages:
    3,483
    Likes Received:
    230
    The farmers in advanced countries apparently plow under approximately 20-30% of the imperfect produce produce because there is no market for it. That's a huge waste of energy and resources. There is now a move afoot to market these albeit at a reduced price. Will you buy imperfect but nutritionally just as good produce? In Japan where appearance is king one chain is specializing in imperfect produce and is getting popular.
     
  2. DYohn

    DYohn Bronze Member Donor Top Poster

    Joined:
    May 8, 2007
    Messages:
    31,440
    Likes Received:
    1,757
    This is one reason why I like Farmer's markets for produce. Imperfect is normal, and it tastes better.
     
    Rick C likes this.
  3. carlthess50

    carlthess50 New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2019
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    1
    All farmers do this. It’s how they rejuvenate the soil If they did not, we would end up having another dust bowl like they had a long time ago over in the flat lands of the west . The dirt needs food as well and that’s how they do it. Over in China and Japan. They flood the fields for this. Same way is use down in lake placid and Sebring Florida
    For the caladiums , they flood the farm lands
    Peanut farmers have to change the crops every other year so the dirt stays healthy and they lose one crop to keep the soils heathy. It’s better then using tons and tons of chemicals, and even when they do use the chemicals. It never does it as well as losing a part of the crop for the soil to stay healthy
     
  4. CJ

    CJ Bronze Member Admin Top Poster

    Joined:
    May 7, 2007
    Messages:
    27,776
    Likes Received:
    1,274
    Maybe I'm mis-reading you. It sounds like you're saying all farmers till under "imperfect" crops. Maybe for "produce" but I assure you that is not the case for all farmers. In the midwest in particular they rotate crops between corn and soybeans to "rejuvenate" the soil. Soybeans provide nitrogen back into the soil that corn strips out. Farmers do till the roots of the prior year crop into the soil. What has prevented another dust bowl is not the act of growing crops just to till under, its not plowing. Plowing is much more aggressive and exposes bare dirt from several inches down with nothing to hold it in place from wind and water erosion. No one plows any more. Farmers use disks and light tillage to create an appropriate seed bed or they actually go no-till when its the corn rotation.
     
    Dan Driscoll and DYohn like this.
  5. JeffC

    JeffC Well-Known Member Donor

    Joined:
    May 8, 2007
    Messages:
    9,240
    Likes Received:
    170
    No-till or low-till in Kansas as well depending on the season.

    I am surprised that with all the good canned produce that they couldn't use it. I would think folks around here would at least just feed it to the hogs. But I really don't know much about farming beyond the wheat farm and limited cattle in the family.
     
    DYohn likes this.
  6. Denton

    Denton Bronze Member Donor Top Poster

    Joined:
    May 8, 2007
    Messages:
    9,056
    Likes Received:
    855
    Yes, I'll buy imperfect produce, I've been to Walmart.
     
  7. John Celardo

    John Celardo Well-Known Member Donor

    Joined:
    May 9, 2007
    Messages:
    4,431
    Likes Received:
    296
    Yes, especially from the farmers market. I've traveled in Europe quite a bit over the last ten years, and many of those countries sell produce that we wouldn't buy here. We stay in apartments rather than hotels so we shop a lot. We've been to Poland often, along with a few countries in that part of Europe. Some of the produce is down right ugly, but it all tastes good. I think we've been overly influenced by Madison Avenue.
     
  8. Dan Driscoll

    Dan Driscoll HTT Refugee Donor

    Joined:
    May 8, 2007
    Messages:
    11,716
    Likes Received:
    244
    When I lived in CA my first stop for produce was almost always one of the various farmers' markets nearby. One of our favorites was less than 1/2 a mile away and we went there at least once a week when (seasonal) it was open. Everything else grocery related we bought at Raley's supermarket, a NorCal regional chain.

    Real farmer's market carry fresh produce, harvested within the past few days and often with the soil still clinging to the roots. Tomatoes at farmers markets are never uniform and aren't available at all in the winter. But when they are the flavor is fantastic. And you can actually taste the difference between varieties.

    Here in FL, not so much. There aren't nearly as many FMs near us and those are mainly roadside stands selling just a few items. We do a lot of our fresh food shopping at a very small local chain (just 4 stores), Detwiler's Farm Market. The rest we do at Publix, one the largest chains in the southeast. We also shop at Trader Joe's occasionally.
     
  9. pillatier

    pillatier Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2007
    Messages:
    3,483
    Likes Received:
    230
    I was surprised to find that produce is more expensive in FL than any places I have lived even though many of the produce is grown in FL. Even oranges are more expensive!
    The link below you may find a farmers market close by -
    These 10 Farmers Markets In Florida Are A Must Visit
     
  10. Dan Driscoll

    Dan Driscoll HTT Refugee Donor

    Joined:
    May 8, 2007
    Messages:
    11,716
    Likes Received:
    244
    We've been to the Sarasota Market a few times, but it is a real pain. Parking is hard to find and often time limited, there are more food vendors than there are actual produce stands and honestly, a lot of it just isn't that good. Detwillers is actually better, IMO.
     

Share This Page